Every country is blessed; but more blessed is Nigeria, which boasts of abundant human and material resources. The country has the capacity to become one of the biggest economies in the world. However, Nigeria has failed to achieve its minimum target of generating steady electricity supply to its people. People are suffering in the midst of plenty—and to cap it up, about 90 percent of our politicians are seeking power for selfish reasons.

Nigeria is one of the very few countries of the world where a politician will cling on to power even in the face of overwhelming evidence of corruption against him. This desperate desire to cling on to power or exploit loopholes in our legal system is the reason why big thieves get away with their crime while smaller thieves die in prisons. Don’t get me wrong, a thief is a thief—so it really doesn’t matter how much has been stolen, a thief should be punished.

Why is it so difficult for a corrupt public officer to resign when their obvious cases of corruption against him? Why must a corrupt politician continue to take the nation for a ride by seeking for endless court injunctions to stop his trial?

The office of the President or Governor or Senate President is a position of trust; but we barely can trust our leaders to be truthful and sincere. As soon as a man gets to any of those positions in Nigeria, he quickly turns himself or herself to a god and starts lording it over his people.

In saner society, a public officer is a servant elected or appointed to serve the people. He doesn’t have more rights than an ordinary man on the streets. He is equal before the law and is subject to similar punishment as any other person when a law is broken. However, things are quite different here in Nigeria. The laws are there to be applied; but it does seem like the laws are not applicable to all.

The rich and powerful can afford dozens of lawyers to fight their case in the court, but posterity will always have its say later in life.